TOBACCO

By: Tejal Patel



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WHAT IS TOBACCO?

Tobacco is a plant grown that produces leaves which have been dried and processed for people to roll up and smoke, chewed, or sniffed.



FACTS ABOUT TOBACCO:


  • Tobacco is one of the most widely abused substances in the world.

  • Each day, more than 3,200 people under 18 smoke their first cigarette, and approximately 2,100 youth and young adults become daily smokers.

  • Tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of death in the United States.

  • There are more than 4,000 chemicals found in the smoke of tobacco products.

  • More than 16 million people already have at least one disease from smoking.



WHAT IS IT USED FOR?

Tobacco is mainly used for:

  • smoking in cigarettes

  • pipe tobacco

  • chewing tobacco

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SOME BENEFICIAL TOBACCO USES ARE:


  • gardening -

great insect repellent for the kitchen garden.

  • medical use -


    a pain reliever for ear aches, toothaches, and decrease in risk of certain inflammatory disorders.
  • mental illness -

has the ability to reduce symptoms of mental illnesses, including anxiety and schizophrenia.


HOW DOES TOBACCO AFFECTS YOUR BODY?


  • BRAIN:

    • make you anxious, nervous, moody, and depressed after you smoke.

    • cause headaches and dizziness.


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  • MOUTH:

    • stains your teeth and gives you bad breath.

    • causes bleeding gums (gum disease) and cancers of the mouth and throat.



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  • HEART:

    • increases your heart rate and blood pressure and causes heart disease and heart attacks.

    • your heart has to work harder to keep up when you play sports.



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  • LUNGS:

    • trouble breathing because smoking damages the lungs.

    • lung cancer

    • violent coughing

        • external image How-To-Detox-Your-Lungs-After-You-Quit-Smoking.jpg
  • SKIN:

    • causes dry, yellow skin and wrinkles.


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WHO CAN BE AFFECTED BY TOBACCO?

(Breathing in secondhand smoke over time can cause a number of health problems for non-smokers)
  • Children

  • Infants

  • Pregnant women

  • Family members

  • Pets


PREVALENCE OF TOBACCO:


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In 2015, over 1.1 billion people smoked tobacco. Far more males than females smoked tobacco.

The CDC reports that cigarette smoking costs more than $193 billion annually in lost productivity and health care costs.

According to the CDC, approximately 3.5 percent of the U.S. adult population uses smokeless tobacco, which poses similarly dangerous health risks.

In 2014, an estimated 16.8% (40.0 million) U.S. adults were current cigarette smokers.
76.8% (30.7 million) smoked every day.
23.2% (9.3 million) smoked some days.

By Sex

Sex
Prevalence
Men
18.8%
Women
14.8%

By Age

Age
Prevalence
18–24 years
16.7%
25–44 years
20.0%
45–64 years
18.0%
65 years and older
8.5%

HOW CAN IT BE TREATED?

    • The patch is known as a nicotine replacement therapy.

    • Nicotine gum can help users who need the oral fixation of smoking or chewing.

    • Nicotine sprays and inhalers can also help by giving low doses of nicotine without tobacco use.

    • Medication such as antidepressant bupropion which was approved by the FDA in 1997 to help people quit smoking.

    • Some doctors recommend the use of medication to help with tobacco addictions.

    • Psychological and Behavioral Treatments.



VIDEOS:








FIND OUT MORE ABOUT TOBACCO AND QUITTING SMOKING:



  • Soft Addictions: Niko
    Habits, compulsive behaviors, or recurring moods or thought patterns.
    • They satisfy a surface want, but ignore or block the satisfaction of a deeper need
    • Cell phones
    • They are completely harmless habits.
    • Some people can go without sleeping and maybe going for a walk outside but if they loose their phone they will stop everything and look relentlessly to find it.
    • They are often related to some kind of stress that may be going on.
    • The lose of someones phone can lead to potentially the most stress they have ever been in.
    • It gives you a temporary high when you satisfy the specific craving you have, making you feel momentarily better about other things that are bothering you.
    • Going on your phone may not get you high like drugs do but they can make you feel like you're in your own little world and nothing else matters and to some may loose touch to reality.
    • Examples include:
    • Texting and driving, Texting and walking, Texting and lifting, going on your phone in class
    • Anything that robs you of time and energy.
    • Behaviors that allow you to hide or escape.
    • Falling behind in school or work due to extensive time satisfying that "surface want".
  • Consequences:
    • Not necessarily harmful or severe.
    • Can take away time that should be spent doing productive tasks.
    • Can take away time from being with your family or friends.
    • Can completely isolate a person from the outside world.
  • Treatments:
    • Identify the problem/addiction.
    • Examine triggers and motivations for their actions/what is causing you to feel stressed out.
    • Make choices that curve the soft addiction such as limiting your time to doing something or having a to do list and not going to sleep until that entire list is checked off, which will prevent you from your addiction.
Drug Abuse:

What is it?

A drug addiction is a very dangerous addiction because it can be very easily started more common when the victim is venerable when they are depressed or pressured.

Physical warning signs of drug abuse- Niko

  • Bloodshot eyes, pupils larger or smaller than usual
  • Changes in appetite or sleep patterns.
  • Sudden weight loss or change.
  • Deterioration of physical appearance, personal grooming habits
  • Unusual smells on breath, body, or clothing
  • Tremors, slurred speech, or impaired coordinationimages.jpg

Behavioral signs of drug abuse

  • Drop in attendance and performance at work or school
  • Unexplained need for money or financial problems. May borrow or steal to get it.
  • Engaging in secretive or suspicious behaviors
  • Sudden change in friends, favorite hangouts, and hobbies
  • Frequently getting into trouble (fights, accidents, illegal activities)

HELP

  • Visit a Narcotics Anonymous meeting in your area. See Resources & References below.
  • Call 1-800-662-HELP in the U.S. to reach a free referral helpline from the external image arrow-10x10.png and Mental Health Services Administrati



























  • Soft Addictions:
    Habits, compulsive behaviors, or recurring moods or thought patterns.
    • They satisfy a surface want, but ignore or block the satisfaction of a deeper need.
    • They are completely harmless habits.
    • They are often related to some kind of stress that may be going on.
    • Increases mostly in poor economic times.
    • It gives you a temporary high when you satisfy the specific craving you have, making you feel momentarily better about other things that are bothering you.
    • Examples include: over shopping, overeating, watching too much TV, too much internet surfing, drinking coffee, emailing, or procrastination.
  • Warning Signs:
    • Anything that robs you of time and energy.
    • Behaviors that allow you to hide or escape.
    • Falling behind in school or work due to extensive time satisfying that "surface want".
  • Consequences:
    • Not necessarily harmful or severe.
    • Can take away time that should be spent doing productive tasks.
    • Can take away time from being with your family or friends.
    • Can completely isolate a person from the outside world.

  • Treatments:
    • Identify the problem/addiction.
    • Examine triggers and motivations for their actions/what is causing you to feel stressed out.
    • Make choices that curve the soft addiction such as limiting your time to doing something or having a to do list and not going to sleep until that entire list is checked off, which will prevent you from your addiction.

Why do some drug users become addicted, while others don’t? -Niko

  • Family history of addiction- some kids see their parents see them doing drugs and see its ok to do them because they see them doing it and they might see that acceptable.
  • Abuse, neglect, or other traumatic experiences in childhood- The type of environment we surround yourself with is also very important because our "friends" may pressure you to smoke or try various types of drugs. Some kids get abused by their families and may see a way out by doing drugs but in reality they just open a new door to so many more problems to their health.
  • Mental disorders such as depression and anxiety- The use of drugs tend to trigger depression symptoms like lethargy, sadness and hopelessness. However, many depressed individuals reach for drugs of alcohol as a way to lift their spirts or to numb painful thoughts.
  • Early use of drugs- Many first try drugs out of curiosity, to have a good time, because friends are doing it, in an effort to improve athletic performance or ease another problem, such as stress, anxiety, or depression.
  • Method of administration- 1. Whenever someone draws in on a cigarette, the smoke goes to the lungs and is then rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream. 2. Around 30 to 60% of snorted chemicals will enter the bloodstream through the mucus membrane in the nose. 3. injecting the drug into your bloodstream is the 3rd way to take drugs.

Physical warning signs of drug abuse

  • Bloodshot eyes, pupils larger or smaller than usual
  • Changes in appetite or sleep patterns. Sudden external image arrow-10x10.png or weight gain
  • Deterioration of physical appearance, personal grooming habits
  • Unusual smells on breath, body, or clothing
  • Tremors, slurred speech, or impaired coordination

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HELP

  • Visit a Narcotics Anonymous meeting in your area. See Resources & References below.
  • Call 1-800-662-HELP in the U.S. to reach a free referral helpline from the external image arrow-10x10.png and Mental Health Services Administration.




Alcohol: by Randy Cali
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What is alcohol? What does it do?

  • -Alcohol is a colorless, volatile liquid that is the intoxicating constituent of wine, beer and other drinks
  • -It is classified as a depressant. It slows down vital functions. Alcohol's effects on the body can result in slurred speech, unsteady movement, disturbed perceptions and an inability to react quickly.
  • -Factors that influence how quickly the body absorbs alcohol: alcohol concentration you drink, amount of food in your stomach, your metabolish, weight, and body mass index; and your mood.
  • -Alcohol overdose causes even more severe depressant effects (inability to feel pain, toxicity where the body vomits the poison, and finally unconsciousness or, worse, coma or death from severe toxic overdose)

Binge Drinking

  • Binge drinking or heavy episodic drinking is a modern epithet for drinking alcoholic beverages with the primary intention of becoming intoxicated by heavy consumption of alcohol over a short period of time
  • One in six U.S. adults binge drinks about four times a month, consuming about eight drinks per binge while only 21% of Americans abstain from drinking altogether.
  • Binge drinking prevalence and intensity of drinking is highest amount persons 18-24
  • Approximately 92% of U.S. adults who drink excessively report binge drinking in the past 30 days
  • More than half of the alcohol consumed by adults in the United States is in the form of binge drinks.
  • Luckily, alcohol consumption among Americans has declined steadily since the late 1970's due to stronger focus on personal health, weight management and physical actvity.

Long Term Effects of Alcoholexternal image alcohol11.jpg

  • Brain
    • Memory Impairment
    • Damaged/Destroyed Brain Cell
  • Immune System
    • Lowered Disease Resistance
  • Heart:
    • Weakened Heart Muscle
    • Stroke
    • High blood pressure
  • Liver:
    • Steatosis, or
    • Alcoholic hepatitis
    • Fibrosis
    • Cirrhosis
  • Digestive System
    • Chronic external image arrow-10x10.png of the stomach and pancreas
    • Women- menstrual irregularties and increased risk of birth defects
    • Male- impotence and testicular astrophy
  • Cancer:
    • Mouth
    • Esophagus
    • Throat
    • Liver
    • Breast

Alcohol Content in Drinks

  • Beer 2–6% alcohol
  • Cider 4–8% alcohol
  • Wine 8–20% alcohol
  • Tequila 40% alcohol
  • Rum 40% or more alcohol
  • Brandy 40% or more alcohol
  • Gin 40–47% alcohol
  • Whiskey 40–50% alcohol
  • Vodka 40–50% alcohol
  • Liqueurs 15–60% alcohol


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Sources:

http://www.healthline.com/health/addiction/tobacco#Overview1
http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/research-reports/tobacco-addiction
http://betobaccofree.hhs.gov/health-effects/nicotine-health/index.html
http://www.mayoclinic.org/nicotine-craving/art-20045454
http://www.niaaa.nih.gov/
http://www.cdc.gov/alcohol/fact-sheets/binge-drinking.htm
smoking kills - Bryan Curtis story









INSTRUCTIONS/ Addictions

Drugs, Alcohol, Tobacco, Soft Addictions
As a group you are responsible for creating your own Wiki covering the topics assigned. You may attach files, articles, videos, pictures and/or word document
Be prepared to give your reports orally to the class using your Wiki.
Included in your report should be a description of the addiction, who it affects, prevalence and treatment.

How to use the wiki page
  1. To enter content on this page, click the EDIT tab located on the top, right side of the page.
  2. Enter the information and click Save to save changes.

You can upload files or create links to external website or to a page in the wiki.
  1. To upload a file or an image, click the Fileicon on the tool bar, upload the file.
  2. Click the Link icon to enter a link to a url or link to a page in the wiki.













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